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en:deep_sleep [2018/10/16 12:23]
tanja
en:deep_sleep [2018/10/16 12:26]
tanja
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 PostCity (externer Veranstaltungsort!) / Sun, Sept 9th, 10:30 – 12:30  PostCity (externer Veranstaltungsort!) / Sun, Sept 9th, 10:30 – 12:30 
  
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 The talk at STWST-Maindeck - with Matthew Fuller, Shu Lea Cheang and Felix Stalder - will draw on STWST SLEEP48 and Fuller'​s recently published book, ‘How to Sleep, the art, biology and culture of unconsciousness’,​ in order to discuss the relations between sleep in culture, sleep science and an aesthetics beyond a classically formulated subject.  In many accounts and representations of sleep, the sleeper becomes a null field, a placeholder for a thinking being; something that will come back to its senses in due course. Drawing on the pre-socratic philosopher Empedocles, an aesthetics of sleep as a bodily, mediatic and ecological admixture of forces is counterposed to this imagined emptiness of sleep.  The thickets of political and cultural systems that grow in and around sleeping bodies, differentially to waking ones, are obliged to encounter this obstinate, fecund and varied force.  The talk at STWST-Maindeck - with Matthew Fuller, Shu Lea Cheang and Felix Stalder - will draw on STWST SLEEP48 and Fuller'​s recently published book, ‘How to Sleep, the art, biology and culture of unconsciousness’,​ in order to discuss the relations between sleep in culture, sleep science and an aesthetics beyond a classically formulated subject.  In many accounts and representations of sleep, the sleeper becomes a null field, a placeholder for a thinking being; something that will come back to its senses in due course. Drawing on the pre-socratic philosopher Empedocles, an aesthetics of sleep as a bodily, mediatic and ecological admixture of forces is counterposed to this imagined emptiness of sleep.  The thickets of political and cultural systems that grow in and around sleeping bodies, differentially to waking ones, are obliged to encounter this obstinate, fecund and varied force. 
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